Jump to content

Welcome to Autoworld Forum !

Sign In or Register to gain full access to our forums. By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

Close
Photo

Cross Drill Brake Rotors


  • Please log in to reply

#21
hello01

Posted 23 March 2005 - 04:43 PM

hello01

    Driver

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 39 posts
Scenic,
How about your 740 brakes then? Are they as efficient as the 244 or
lousier?

#22
scenic

Posted 23 March 2005 - 04:53 PM

scenic

    Tokyo Drifter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,156 posts
Equally good. Volvo has one of the best braking system in the world if not
how to bring a 2 tonner to a halt.Big Smile

May be you can check your brake servo system, the thickness of your disc
plates, pads,the brake fluid contain to see there is any leaks, the brake
hose, any bubble in there and work from there upwards.

#23
cap48

Posted 23 March 2005 - 06:23 PM

cap48

    Road Warrior

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 692 posts
scenic, good advise.ThumbUp The 240 brakes should not feel "lousy" or soft &
should be more than enough to stop the car from 160kph. My bet is on the
brake hose in this case. Good luck.

#24
vol940

Posted 23 March 2005 - 06:41 PM

vol940

    Taxi Driver

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 372 posts
Imagine you have a huge Kinetic Energy = 0.5 * M * V * V. Your brick is
2,000 kg times square of your speed, then transffered into heat when
breaking. Break shall be efficient enough to convert that kinetic energy,
if not you need loger distance to stop your brick.

#25
pocik71

Posted 24 March 2005 - 02:59 AM

pocik71

    Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 137 posts
glock....i did install the goodridge stainless steel hoses all round since it came whole set front n rear n found to b slight improvement in term of brake sponginess...okla! anyway the old original hoses of mine already bloated n shows some cracked!....so i think its just in time...

#26
glock19

Posted 24 March 2005 - 07:18 AM

glock19

    Tokyo Drifter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,274 posts
For those who are not in my e-mail list, please find the part of the
contents below. I think it's informative and will benefit the group.

Hello01, maybe you should do it first and try.

What is "bleeding the brakes" and why is that sometimes necessary?
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Bleeding the brakes is flushing the old brake fluid out of the master
cylinder, brake lines, calipers and wheel cylinders and replacing it with
fresh fluid.
Bleeding is necessary for two reasons:

To remove air bubbles that may have entered the system while repairs were
being made, because of a leak or because the fluid level got too low. The
air must be removed because it is compressible and can prevent a full,
firm pedal.

The individual brake lines must be bled in a specified sequence (which
varies from vehicle to vehicle depending on the design of the brake
system) to remove all the air from the lines. On some ABS-equipped
vehicles, special bleeding procedures may be required (which also requires
special equipment in some cases such as a scan tool to cycle the ABS
solenoids).

The brakes can be bled manually by attaching a piece of clear tubing to
the bleeder screw on each caliper and wheel cylinder, opening the screw
and manually stroking the brake pedal to force fluid through the lines, or
with power bleeding equipment. Most professionals use power bleeding
equipment because it's faster and easier.
To remove moisture contamination. Brake fluid needs to be replaced
periodically because DOT 3 and 4 brake fluids are glycol-based and absorb
moisture over time. This occurs whether a vehicle is driven 30,000 miles a
year or just sits in a garage because fluid contamination is a function of
time and humidity rather than mileage. Moisture enters the system past
seals and through microscopic pores in hoses. It also enters every time
the fluid reservoir is opened (a good reason not to do so unnecessarily).

After only a year of service, DOT 3 fluid may contain as much as 2% water.
After 18 months, the level of contamination can be as high as 3%. And
after several years of service, it's not unusual to find brake fluid that
has soaked up as much as 7 to 8% water. Many vehicles that are six, seven
or eight years old have never had the brake fluid changed!

As the fluid soaks up moisture, it thickens and becomes less able to
withstand heat and corrosion. The result is a significant drop in the
fluid's boiling temperature, which may under the right conditions allow
the fluid to boil in the calipers. Once brake fluid turns to vapor, the
bubbles cause an increase in the distance the pedal must travel to apply
the brakes. This condition should not be confused with "brake fade" that
occurs when the brake linings get too hot as a result of prolonged
braking. Brake fade requires greater and greater pedal effort to stop the
vehicle while fluid boil increases pedal travel and makes the pedal feel
soft or mushy. The danger of fluid boil is greatest in more modern cars,
SUV's and trucks because of the higher operating temperatures that are
generated in today's downsized front brakes, resulting from the increased
weight of the vehicle. Semi-metallic linings, while typically more
aggressive and able to operate at higher temperatures, tend to compound
the heat problem by conducting heat from the rotors to the calipers. If
the fluid contains a lot of moisture and can't take the heat, it'll
probably boil.

DOT 3 brake fluid, which has long been used in most domestic cars and
light trucks, has a minimum dry boiling point of 401 degrees F. A 3% level
of water contamination will lower this by 25% or 100 degrees! DOT 4 "extra
heavy-duty" brake fluid, which is used in many European cars, has a higher
dry boiling point of 446 degrees F. DOT 4 soaks up moisture at a slower
rate than DOT 3 but suffers a greater drop in heat resistance as moisture
builds up. Only 2% moisture in DOT 4 fluid will lower its boiling point by
ay tint ▒For those who are not in my e-mail list, please find the part of the
contents below. I think it's informative and will benefit the group.

Hello01, maybe you should do it first and try.

What is "bleeding the brakes" and why is that sometimes necessary?
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Bleeding the brakes is flushing the old brake fluid out of the master
cylinder, brake lines, calipers and wheel cylinders and replacing it with
fresh fluid.
Bleeding is necessary for two reasons:

To remove air bubbles that may have entered the system while repairs were
being made, because of a leak or because the fluid level got too low. The
air must be removed because it is compressible and can prevent a full,
firm pedal.

The individual brake lines must be bled in a specified sequence (which
varies from vehicle to vehicle depending on the design of the brake
system) to remove all the air from the lines. On some ABS-equipped
vehicles, special bleeding procedures may be required (which also requires
special equipment in some cases such as a scan tool to cycle the ABS
solenoids).

The brakes can be bled manually by attaching a piece of clear tubing to
the bleeder screw on each caliper and wheel cylinder, opening the screw
and manually stroking the brake pedal to force fluid through the lines, or
with power bleeding equipment. Most professionals use power bleeding
equipment because it's faster and easier.
To remove moisture contamination. Brake fluid needs to be replaced
periodically because DOT 3 and 4 brake fluids are glycol-based and absorb
moisture over time. This occurs whether a vehicle is driven 30,000 miles a
year or just sits in a garage because fluid contamination is a function of
time and humidity rather than mileage. Moisture enters the system past
seals and through microscopic pores in hoses. It also enters every time
the fluid reservoir is opened (a good reason not to do so unnecessarily).

After only a year of service, DOT 3 fluid may contain as much as 2% water.
After 18 months, the level of contamination can be as high as 3%. And
after several years of service, it's not unusual to find brake fluid that
has soaked up as much as 7 to 8% water. Many vehicles that are six, seven
or eight years old have never had the brake fluid changed!

As the fluid soaks up moisture, it thickens and becomes less able to
withstand heat and corrosion. The result is a significant drop in the
fluid's boiling temperature, which may under the right conditions allow
the fluid to boil in the calipers. Once brake fluid turns to vapor, the
bubbles cause an increase in the distance the pedal must travel to apply
the brakes. This condition should not be confused with "brake fade" that
occurs when the brake linings get too hot as a result of prolonged
braking. Brake fade requires greater and greater pedal effort to stop the
vehicle while fluid boil increases pedal travel and makes the pedal feel
soft or mushy. The danger of fluid boil is greatest in more modern cars,
SUV's and trucks because of the higher operating temperatures that are
generated in today's downsized front brakes, resulting from the increased
weight of the vehicle. Semi-metallic linings, while typically more
aggressive and able to operate at higher temperatures, tend to compound
the heat problem by conducting heat from the rotors to the calipers. If
the fluid contains a lot of moisture and can't take the heat, it'll
probably boil.

DOT 3 brake fluid, which has long been used in most domestic cars and
light trucks, has a minimum dry boiling point of 401 degrees F. A 3% level
of water contami

#27
scenic

Posted 24 March 2005 - 10:05 AM

scenic

    Tokyo Drifter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,156 posts
Hi glock19,
Can 740 be in your mailing list ? 740 may be an old car already but still
feel solid on the road. Hee, Hee. Still waiting for your 850T5 photo
shoots leh.Big Smile

#28
hello01

Posted 24 March 2005 - 04:22 PM

hello01

    Driver

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 39 posts
Glock19,
I have done that. Flushing and replenished with DOT4. New break pads. No
leak in system. Servo is good.
Maybe I have to drive another 240 to get the feel.


#29
scenic

Posted 24 March 2005 - 05:01 PM

scenic

    Tokyo Drifter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,156 posts
hello01,
What's your ride prior to your present 240 ?

#30
glock19

Posted 25 March 2005 - 02:38 PM

glock19

    Tokyo Drifter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,274 posts
Scenic,
What's your e-mail address ?