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S40 2.4i with HID(Xenon)


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#11
V406198

Posted 26 January 2006 - 03:43 PM

V406198

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andrewlim8

Not agreed to your statement that all car can fitted after market HID ..
to those cars that have less electronic gadget/ sensor are alright to
install once as not / simple ECU can't detect the wrong inform
coming from after market stuff that are in different spec from original
set up in your ECU.....

And for those more advance model like S40 , V50, S60, S80 and
XC70 & 90 are not advisable to installed after market HID as you
need to false the signal to your ECU by install additinal voltage of light
to matching the original set up, otherwise you will be always driving
your car with the warning light of "CHECK LIGHTING "on ...and this
will jeopardize your car warranty ...

So use only Volvo manufacture recommedation fitting like Hella and
Philips HID....especially on the ballast & light bulbs

#12
vrsimha

Posted 26 January 2006 - 05:19 PM

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Hi Richards,
I assume that you have installed Hella or Philips HID on your V40? If you
have, please share with us the price and the best place to install it.

Thanks
Rgds,
SuperDave


#13
V406198

Posted 26 January 2006 - 06:15 PM

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vrsimha

Oaaaa...i'm just a poor V40 owner than can't afford to install any HID
...but HID alike halogen bulb yes la...hehehe, the inform of the HID
installation to our Vo.vo car are learned from VOCM forum...so sorry la
can't help much here on price & selling place.., may be you can find
the inform over at Vocm. Good luck.

#14
Kevin

Posted 27 January 2006 - 03:57 PM

Kevin

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Guys,

It is very simple. There are a few good articles on the Net about HID and
the difference between the real thing and "HID white bulbs".

I'll try to explain in laymen terms the differences.

The usual bulbs you find in most cars these days are halogen bulbs.
Typically bulbs are rated 2 ways, by colour temperature (K) or intensity
(lumens). 1 lumen is the amount of light given out by 1 candle (I think!) K
and lumens are inter-related but it does not mean that a bulb with higher K
will automatically translate to a brighter bulb. Brightness comes from
lumens, not K. K determines the colour of the beam. The higher the K, the
whiter the beam will appear.

Everyone should know the colour breakdown of light as per a rainbow. White
bulbs achieve their whiteness by removing the red end of the colour
spectrum, leaving the blue and green end. It is this red spectrum that can
cut through fog and heavy rain to illuminate the road ahead. The blue
spectrum does not travel very far. I believe that this is why on a cloudy
day, UV rays (which are predominantly blue spectrum) are filtered out but
the infra-red rays still get through (which is why solar panels still
operate on a cloudy day). So halogen white bulbs have higher K, lower
lumens and thus will not work well on a rainy day.

HID (high intensity discharge) technology runs on a different principle
altogether. Instead of running a current through a filament in a glass
enclosure, the current has to make a jump between 2 electrodes sealed in a
gas-filled chamber (usually rare Group 7 gases with xenon as the main gas
used). This is why HID bulbs are typically called xenon bulbs. HID bulbs
look very different from normal H4, H1, H7, W5W halogen bulbs. They are
very much longer and slightly narrower in profile. There are 2 types of HID
bulbs, D2S and D2R. 1 comes with a built-in reflector and 1 doesn't. For
cars with HID projector lamps, the non-reflector type is used.

A very large current is used to jump start the HID bulb after which, the
current has to be carefully regulated to ensure proper bulb operation. This
is why all HID systems come with an electronic ballast mounted on the back
of the headlamp assembly. This looks very much like a smaller version of a
car's ECU.

Ballasts are made by the usual suspects in Europe; Philips and Osram, with
many Taiwan and Korean made ones flooding the market as well. As always,
you get what you pay for. You can even find fake Osrams and Philips these
days so if you are offered something from Osram dirt cheap, chances are it
is fake. Bulbs are also made by Osram and Philips. I don't think there are
Korean or Taiwan HID bulbs. Not too sure though.

The best way is to check on the Net to see if your specific car model sold
overseas has a HID option, it so you can definitely buy either the original
or OEM kit for retro-fitting. Not only will you have to change the bulbs
and add in the electronic ballast, you will also need to change the
headlamps to ensure proper beam focus on the road as the beam patterns
differ between HID and halogen. Better systems come with self-levelling
headlamps dependent on vehicle load.

To cut cost, purchase the HID kits without the lamps but you will have
other road users swearing at you and writing complaint letters to the Star.

The even cheaper option is to buy German kits not OEM for your car. Go
Korean if you are even more cheapskate. But this is not recommended if you
want to preserve the integrity of the electronics in your car. Bear in mind
that when you opt for the original HID kit, a couple of fuses will have to
be changed to accomodate the higher current (usually uprating the headlamps
fuses by 5 to 10 amps). On more advanced cars, the ECU must be reprogrammed
to let the car know that it has HIDs else the warning lamps will always be
on (BMWs, I know require this to be done).

Ah Beng's (if I may use this term) can go for white "HID" bulbs which are
actually halogens with a filter to cut out the red spectrum. Maybe with
their wattage py tint Guys,

It is very simple. There are a few good articles on the Net about HID and
the difference between the real thing and "HID white bulbs".

I'll try to explain in laymen terms the differences.

The usual bulbs you find in most cars these days are halogen bulbs.
Typically bulbs are rated 2 ways, by colour temperature (K) or intensity
(lumens). 1 lumen is the amount of light given out by 1 candle (I think!) K
and lumens are inter-related but it does not mean that a bulb with higher K
will automatically translate to a brighter bulb. Brightness comes from
lumens, not K. K determines the colour of the beam. The higher the K, the
whiter the beam will appear.

Everyone should know the colour breakdown of light as per a rainbow. White
bulbs achieve their whiteness by removing the red end of the colour
spectrum, leaving the blue and green end. It is this red spectrum that can
cut through fog and heavy rain to illuminate the road ahead. The blue
spectrum does not travel very far. I b

#15
andrewlim8

Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:35 PM

andrewlim8

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kevin,

really appreciated on your detailed explainations!

do u know how much for the philips vision plus? is it easy to install? my
model is S40 2.4iSmile

ThumbUp

#16
soho81

Posted 28 January 2006 - 08:13 AM

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Was just wondering...why are they not bringing in the bi-xenons as an
option anyway?

#17
beemerlover

Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:49 PM

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Pardon my ignorance but is Xenon lights the same as HID? Question

#18
andrewlim8

Posted 28 January 2006 - 01:50 PM

andrewlim8

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xenon is same hid....

FA told me that can place an order for the bi-xenon, costs around 4k
plus, anyone enquired this b4?

#19
Kevin

Posted 03 February 2006 - 03:26 PM

Kevin

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Vision Plus retails at between RM35-RM50 depending on bulb type and where
you buy it from. Changing it is as easy as changing any other bulb on your
car. How difficult it is depends on easy it is to access your car's bulbs.

I heard from a sales rep at SM that, to date, they have yet to install
Volvo OEM bi-xenons on S40s. They have had customers who fitted Korean HID
kits to their cars. Didn't hear of any problems but these crop up much
later anyway.

#20
Sotong

Posted 06 February 2006 - 10:29 AM

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Andrew,

Yes, you can buy Phillips bulbs for the S40 2.4. The size is H7, and it can
be relatively easy to fit it yourself (just look at the manual, quite easy
to follow..need to take out the entire headlight cover tho!).

The newer Phillips bulbs (i think) are the Diamond Vision and Crystal
Vision. A hint, don't buy it from Eneos. Super-expensive!!

Rgds

PS I once email Volvo Msia and they told me I couldn't fit OEM bi-xenons on
the S40 coz 'a lot of wiring relays needed to be changed'.